Category Archives: T2

How to improve on a classic!. The best selling version of the Transporter

Rebuilding the gear linkage

Many of us suffer from that indistinct, rather sloppy gear change. In fact, fixing it is a bit time consuming and will make you a bit oily but is not as tricky as you might think.

This video is for a VW Beetle but a split screen, early Bay, late Bay, type 25 and type 3 all have a similar mechanism. Buy the right parts, have a wire brush and some degreaser like Gunk handy and it can transform you gear changes!

Couple drives from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego in their rebuilt ’75 VW camper van

http://www.adn.com/article/20160317/anchorage-couple-drives-tierra-del-fuego-their-rebuilt-75-vw-camper-van

 

In fact, she said, people have been “open and kind and welcoming” everywhere
they’ve gone on this odyssey. “You hear bad things in the news, but overall
people are willing to help. They’ll drop everything they’re doing and invite you
in.”
Vought was quick to ascribe their cordial reception to the vehicle. “It’s the
bus,” he said. “People in all countries seem to love the VW bus. They’re already
kind of looking at you anyway, and when they see the bus, it’s like instant
smiles and instant friends.”

 

 

The bus at “Mano de Desierto,” a large sculpture of a hand in Chile’s Atacama Desert.

 

 

 

 

Dillon Vought and Tessa Ely didn’t know each other when they attended Service
High School at the same time. Big school, different classes, different crowds.
You know how it goes.
But they’re plenty familiar with each other now. For the past year, they have
traveled 26,000 miles throughout the Western Hemisphere in a Volkswagen
Westfalia pop-top camper bus.

“We just got the idea that we wanted to do some long-term travel,” said Vought.
“We did a few road trips around Alaska and it sort of evolved into this.”
The Alaska Dispatch News contacted the couple in Tierra del Fuego, the
southernmost part of South America. Ely said the place felt a little like
Alaska.
“There’s free camping everywhere,” she said. “It’s very safe. And everyone’s
very friendly.”

Vought, 29, got a degree in marketing at a college in Reno, Nevada, before
moving back to Anchorage, where he has worked in logistical support for the oil
industry. Ely, 27, studied at UAA and became a special-education teacher with
the Anchorage School District. Of course, for the last 13 months they’ve been on
what can only be described as an extended leave of absence.
“It’s more like two years,” Vought said. But during the first year of the
adventure, the bus didn’t go anywhere as they rebuilt it.
They bought the broken-down 1975 Westfalia for $500. “It was the only one for
sale two years ago,” he said. They found it slowly weathering away in Hope. It
took a year of busted knuckles and “a lot of duct tape” before the thing was
ready to roll. In the process they added insulation, an RV furnace and changed
the horrible orange paint to a classic green and white two-tone.
Most important, they replaced the old air-cooled engine, a 1960s design, with a
modern Subaru Boxer 2.2 water-cooled engine. The original could churn up 66
horsepower and was famously underpowered, particularly on hills. The Boxer
produces 100 horsepower or better and is more fuel efficient than the vintage
technology.
It was time well spent, Vought said. “It’s really a blessing that we rebuilt the
entire thing, because now we know what’s going on with it. We can do most of the
fixes ourselves. You don’t need to worry about finding a good mechanic.”
They had considered taking a year to drive around Asia, but decided South
America would be easier, more right-in-the-neighborhood. “Tessa knew some
Spanish,” Vought said. “It was a more reachable trip.”
The journey began with a long drive down the West Coast. “We were hoping to ski
quite a bit,” Vought said. “But it was a bad year for skiing all over. We didn’t
actually get out and do anything until we got to Vancouver Island. And then it
was surfing. In February.”
They did manage to find snow in Montana. Then they joined a couple of other VW
buses for a mini-caravan drive down the Baja Peninsula, where they spent a
month. From there, the couple ferried the bus to the mainland, headed down the
west coast of Mexico, cut over to the Yucatan and proceeded through Central
America, surfing and camping on beaches as they went.
The Panama Canal brought a gap in road travel. The bus was shipped to Colombia
and the travelers followed by sail. After another month in Colombia, they
continued into the Andes, traveling through Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile.
The southern terminus of the trip came at the end of the Pan American Highway,
just past Ushuaia, Argentina, latitude 54 degrees and change. It’s sometimes
referred to as “the end of the world.”
“We considered going further by boat to Antarctica,” Vought said. But “the
cheapest tour would still have been $5,000.”

Though the trip has been decidedly frugal, it hasn’t been free. The travelers
are already contemplating their return to home and jobs.
“We’ll cruise around Patagonia for a few months, then ship the bus to Florida
from Buenos Aires,” Ely said. While the bus is on the boat she’ll come back to
Alaska to work and Vought will backpack. They’ll reconnect with their trusty
transport in mid-June and drive through the U.S. and Canada “and see how long we
can make our money last,” she said.
The last logical leg will come after they return to Alaska, a run up the Dalton
Highway to Prudhoe Bay.
“I think we’re going to do a photo book,” Vought said. “But we probably won’t
actually complete it until we’re back in Anchorage.”
They’ll come home with a log-book of white-knuckle experiences. “Bolivia has the
worst roads,” Vought said. “We came out there with suspension issues. I’ve had
to replace the shocks and replace the clutch cable five times now.”

“And we’ve gotten a few bouts of stomach illness,” he continued. “Times when you
have to hole up in a hotel for a while and just pray you’re going to get
better.”

“I was getting pretty sick in El Salvador,” Ely said. “Dealing with hospitals
and the language barrier is something I don’t want to relive again.”

“The good part is that the local medical care people know how to treat the
common ailments in the area,” said Vought. “They can help you get well, even if
it seems like the most horrible thing.”

The payoff has been the people, Vought said. That goal was at the top of their
reasons for making the trip.

“We wanted to get more engulfed into the culture, go places that the tourists
don’t go, talk to the locals,” he said. “It’s been great. Every time we have a
question or a loss, you don’t hesitate to ask anyone because everyone is so
willing to help. You ask someone for directions and they ask you to stay at
their place.”

One question they get asked a lot is whether they want to sell the bus. The
answer is always no. “It’s our baby!” said Ely.
“Besides, if we have kids, they’re going to see pictures of this trip and
pictures of the bus,” said Vought. “And if we don’t still have it, they’ll kill
us.”
BLOG Follow the travels of Dillon Vought, Tessa Ely and their 1975 VW camper bus
at thebusandus.com.

VW makes electric vehicle

Following on from our recent post about the id Buzz http://vwt2oc.co/wp/2018/10/26/the-id-buzz/ did you know that is not the first electric vehicle from Volkswagen based on the classic type 2 chassis?

Ah, but did you also know this original version was a little older?

Back in 1970, Adolf Kalberlah was there looking at alternative methods of power and VW made a type 2 T2 Bay window with a top speed of 43mph and a range of 43 miles.

That is about 7 times the range of some of the current crop of electric vehicles and this was 48 years ago.

Read the full details at https://www.volkswagen-vans.co.uk/content/vw_nfz/magazine/gb/en/e-campervan.html

Spookie’s restoration

After the iconic split screen had been produced for more than a decade, VW introduced the “Bay window” in 1968. Special Patrol Group member Mike carefully restored Spookie the 1972 crossover Bay over 20 years ago and carefully documented each section of the rebuild.

Hand drawn specific details have proved very useful to amateur restorers ever since and the film based photographs are there for posterity.

Mike owned and ran Spookie for 18 years with no issues during that time before selling him a few years ago. A great story of rebuilding when parts were scarce and documentation was minimal and an inspiration to us all. Anyone know the current owner?

http://www.specialpatrolgroup.co.uk/spooky/

Orders of The VW T2 Skyrocket following end of production

Orders of The VW T2 Skyrocket.

Orders of The VW T2 Skyrocket

The Volkswagen T2 is one of the most iconic campervans in the world. Its popularity and evergreen design has endured for over half a century with over 10 million having been produced. Caravan Owners Club recently reported that production of this incredibly popular vehicle will finally come to an end on 31st December this year.

Despite still being one of Volkswagen’s most successful products, with output being presold even today, health and safety laws being introduced in Brazil mean that the vehicle’s lack of airbags and ABS system will signal the end of production at the VW plant in Anchieta.

Despite this rather gloomy news there has been a silver lining for campervan conversion company Danbury Motorcaravans, who have seen orders for converted T2’s skyrocket since the end of the Type 2 was announced.

“We are absolutely inundated,” Jason Jones, sales manager at Danbury told Caravan Owners Club.

“People who have thought about buying a T2 but have maybe put it off, now have a limited time in which to order one, because on the 31st December production will stop forever.

“Plus of course the production run always sells out in advance, so if someone is wanting to buy a T2 then the time to order one is now because we have no way of knowing when the production run will be fully allocated. We’ll just find one day that we hit the button to order and find that it is no longer possible.”

When asked whether he thought that the T2 might make a comeback at some point in the future with ABS and airbags fitted Jason replied:

“There is no way that it can be done. It just isn’t possible with this vehicle, these really will be the last VW T2’s ever produced and that’s why we’re going to document the last ever shipment that we receive and put the images on our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/danburymotorcaravans) to commemorate the end of production.”

Although those who want to capture the symbolic freedom that the type 2 represents may be disappointed if they do miss out, it’s not all bad news as there are other high quality campervans available as an alternative, like Danburys T5, VW Caddy, or Fiat Doblo conversions.

Danbury’s new double back T5 campervan comes with an unprecedented choice of 10 different wood finishes, 5 different flooring options, and 150 types of fabric and leather finishes meaning that each one is different and is really a bespoke design depending on the preference of the consumer.

So while the 31st December will mark the end of the road for one of the most popular campervans ever produced, you do have a last chance in which to order one if you act quickly.

Links:

You can see the new T5 range here: http://www.danburymotorcaravans.com/models/model.aspx?modelID=2

 

See what Jason Bradbury of Channel 5’s Gadget Show had to say about the VW T2 after he took one touring around the South Coast here: http://www.danburymotorcaravans.com/models/modeltype.aspx?modelID=1&modeltypeID=7

Danburys Facebook page where they will document the last ever shipment of VW Type 2’s here: https://www.facebook.com/danburymotorcaravans) to commemorate the end of production

See Danburys new T5 range here: http://www.danburymotorcaravans.com/models/model.aspx?modelID=2

Pimp my VW campervan: van boasts flatscreen TVs, three electric sunroofs and Porsche alloy wheels | Mail Online

Pimp my VW campervan: van boasts flatscreen TVs, three electric sunroofs and Porsche alloy wheels | Mail Online.

Inside the campervan fit for a boy racer: £55,000 VW pimped up with flatscreen TVs, three electric sunroofs and Porsche alloy wheels

  • Danbury Motorcaravans asked its staff which features they’d like in a van
  • They said bright headlights, high-spec sound system and king-sized bed
  • The Bristol-based firm sells basic Type 2 VW campervans for £27,000

A company that customises VW campervans asked its employees to design their money-no-object, dream vehicle, and this is what they came up with.

A £55,000, state-of-the-art moving palace, with hidden Sony Bravia flatscreen TVs, rear-view camera, and ultra-high spec entertainment system.

The iconic VW Type 2 campervan has been customised by Bristol-based Danbury Motorcaravans, and costs twice the price of their average camper.

Scroll down for video

Pimp my ride: The Project 1 VW campervan boasts a host of features to justify its £55,000 price tag

Pimp my ride: The Project 1 VW campervan boasts a host of features to justify its £55,000 price tag

The ultra high-spec Project 1 campervan was produced by Bristol-based Danbury Motorcaravans

The ultra high-spec Project 1 campervan was produced by Bristol-based Danbury Motorcaravans

Built as a one-off for fun, the van dubbed Project 1 has everything those who pimp vans for a living would want in their ultimate vehicle.

It comes with all the usual campervan regulars like a galley kitchen, comfortable seats and a bed, but also has top of the range features including two flatscreen TVs, three electric sunroofs, four swivelling chairs and Porsche alloy wheels.

The van also boasts super-bright headlights, a custom white, black and orange paint job, and a hidden king-size bed, while the whole chassis has been lowered to just a few inches off the floor.

 

Danbury Motorcaravans have been customising campers since 1950, but staff there say this is the most extravagant van they have ever built.

Jason Jones said: ‘We have 40 people working for us at Danbury and for a bit of fun we asked everyone to tell us what features their dream camper would have.

‘We listened to them all and then spent the next two years building a van that incorporated everyone’s ideas.

Inside the super pimped up campervan fit for a boy racer

No ordinary campervan: The pimped version has a sporty orange, black and white paint theme and leather seats

No ordinary campervan: The pimped version has an orange, black and white paint theme and leather seats

 

The £55,000 van boasts a sleek kitchen with fridge, cooker and sink, plus a king-size bed and flatscreen TVs

The £55,000 van boasts a sleek kitchen with fridge, cooker and sink, plus a king-size bed and flatscreen TVs

 

One-off van designed just for fun: The team at Danbury spent two years designing their dream VW campervan

One-off van designed just for fun: The team at Danbury spent two years designing their dream VW campervan

‘The result is the Project 1 van, which is without a doubt the most bling VW Campervan in the world. There really was no expense spared – and the end product is simply stunning.

‘Everything we have put in the van is top of the range, from the 32ins Sony Bravia flatscreen TV that pops up from under the bed, to the carbon fibre trims.

‘It’s everything you could ever wish for in a campervan.’

The deluxe van is the latest in a long line of VW campervans, which became an instant hit with travellers worldwide after their launch by the German car company.

With its retro yet sporty interior, the new campervan will appeal to VW enthusiasts who appreciate luxuries

With its retro yet sporty interior, the new campervan will appeal to VW enthusiasts who appreciate luxuries

 

The van's makers say it is 'customised to the absolute max', with features including Porsche alloys and dark glass

The van’s makers say it is ‘customised to the absolute max’, with features including Porsche alloys and dark glass

The original vans were called Type 2, following on from their first offering the Type 1, which is better known nowadays as the Beetle.

Production in the UK stopped in 1967 but continued in South America, and Brazil is the only country in the world still manufacturing Type 2 campervans.

Danbury sells customised Type 2 campervans which cost from around £27,000.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2389831/Pimp-VW-campervan-van-boasts-flatscreen-TVs-electric-sunroofs-Porsche-alloy-wheels.html#ixzz2bz0IyPxf
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VW T2 Camper Van Review – Classic cars driven

VW T2 Camper Van Review.

2007 VW T2 Camper Van Driven

There is nothing cooler than a VW T2 Camper Van and so we borrowed one from classic-campervans.co.uk who operate out of Classic Car Club London’s N1 base for the weekend to find out exactly how cool.

Ice cool, as it turns out, judging by the waves, positive feedback, adulation and general interest our 2007 Danbury converted camper generated. Whether it was the history of these iconic vehicles that incidentally celebrate 64 years of continuous production in 2013, more on which later, cool blue hue, lowered stance, smart interior or sexy alloys isn’t clear. Everyone, young and old wanted to chat, touch, look inside or simply know more. This really was the classic car equivalent of getting a puppy; a people magnet with a very strong pull.

View from a T2

Enjoying the view from our borrowed T2

That when you think about it is a little odd, given that the VW Type 2 (T2) was originally an attempt to re-use the VW Type 1 (T1 or Beetle) platform in a more practical way, the brainchild of Dutch car importer Ben Pon in 1946. Three years later in 1949 the first split windscreen T2’s appeared and eight years after that in 1967 the first ‘Bay’ front window vehicles started to be produced. Something that continued in Germany until 1979 when production swapped to the squarer looking T3, Mexico until 1994 and amazingly Brazil until the end of this year (2013). Danbury and others will be forced to convert second hand vans after all of the new stock has been consumed. Another interesting point, all camper vans were and continue to be today converted Type 2 buses, albeit originally offered as new in partnership with specialists such as Devon and Westfalia, the latter often referred to as ‘Westies’.

Top Tip: Remove Air Vent to cool your beer en-route

Top Tip: Remove Air Vent to cool your beer en-route

The question remained, how does a converted utilitarian commercial vehicle dating back to shortly after the second world war win over the hearts of so many people and for so long? Well, being frank judging by our two days experience it can’t be about practicality, the inside is cosy at best, or comfort whilst on the move, it is after all quite noisy to pilot, and it certainly isn’t about decent cross-country pace because 55-60mph is as fast as you dare without running the risk of blowing the engine up. Worse still travelling above 60mph tests not only your nerve, but also the ancient and heavy powerless and somewhat vague steering as well as rudimentary suspension to the extreme as the T2 bounces and weaves its way along the highway. There are alternatives on the market that tackle all of those points in a much better way, but then they’re not the reason you and so many others like you want a T2 so badly. Because just like getting that puppy, buying a converted VW Type 2 Bus is much more a lifestyle choice.

In a T2 there's usually a queue

In a T2 there’s usually a queue

I dwelled on the why all the time we had our van and the word that kept coming back even with a contemporary conversion like this 2007 Danbury was ‘simplicity’. These vehicles are like life stripped right back down to the bone. There is no fat, or waste, just an honest attempt to transport up to four people around with luggage, feed everyone and then accommodate them overnight. The additional two needing to be children really as the extra sleeping spaces involve hammocks or relatively thin flooring that make use of the elevated roof space. For two adults that same space can be used for the luggage previously stored in the boot and forced to move in order to make way for the bed, an arrangement that works perfectly well. So much so I challenge anyone to find a more romantic way to spend a weekend than tootling around in a T2 stopping only when you want to, which on the glorious weekend we had was to watch the sun go down whilst enjoying that naturally chilled bottle of beer.

2007 Brazilian T2 (left) next to original 1973 Camper (Right)

2007 Brazilian T2 ‘Molly’ (left) next to original 1973 Camper ‘Olive’ (Right)

If you’re interested in some other minor Camper Van blah-blah then be aware that the later Brazilian built T2’s moved away from the infamous air-cooled flat four engine to a more modern Polo water cooled in-line four unit around 2005-2006. That those same sourced vehicles may require protecting to prevent them rusting away whilst removed from their far drier climate. All will need a heater adding, our Danbury had a Webasto unit retro-fitted, and all will have been converted from left hand drive and so the sliding door on the side is to the right and not kerbside in the UK at least on the left. Other than that the newer vehicles should have a tidier and possibly more practical interior with a cleaner layout that includes essentials like a small fridge. This as opposed to an original not so cool, ‘cool’ cupboard one owner showed us on their ’74 Devon for instance.

Choosing one of these vehicles carefully is particularly important because much like a puppy or in classic car terms say a Morgan 3 Wheeler (M3W) it might not be for you. Puppy’s take up a lot of time and energy and M3W’s are difficult to get in and out of, offer no weather protection and are extremely noisy to drive. Camper Vans offer similar challenges, being tight on space inside, slow and noisy to travel in (motorways being most tricky given that foreign registered trucks are not restricted to 55mph) very expensive to buy new, or requiring a lot of time and energy as a second hand proposition. If you are in the market and haven’t experienced one previously our plea is to try before you buy because after all much like puppy dogs Camper Vans are not just for Christmas, they’re for life.

How does this car make you feel?

In one word: Hippy

As a favourite meal: BBQ chicken washed down with a bottle of beer nicely chilled on the journey down

Anything Else: Such simplicity in the complex world we live in today is still very refreshing

Key Ingredients: Simple and modest design, cutesy looks, universal appeal, cosy but comfortable bed, air cooled flat four engine (missing on final Brazilian built vans)

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With thanks to Classic Camper Vans For Hire and Classic Car Club – London

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